Notice to employees due September 30, and required contribution withholding begins October 1.

Massachusetts’ Paid Family and Medical Leave program was signed into law in June 2018, and cannot be utilized by employees until January 2021. But by September 30, 2019, employers must notify all covered individuals of the Paid Family and Medical Leave program, and on October 1, 2019, employers must begin payroll deductions for Q2 2019 unless an exemption has been approved. Continue Reading UPDATE: Massachusetts Paid Family and Medical Leave Employer Deadlines

Last summer, Governor Baker signed “An Act Relative to Minimum Wage, Paid Family Medical Leave, and the Sales Tax Holiday” (H.4640), which in part created a new Paid Family and Medical Leave program in the Commonwealth.  We provided further program details here. Continue Reading Massachusetts Halts Paid Family and Medical Leave

Monumental changes to Connecticut employment law are on the horizon.

Late last week, the House approved a bill creating a paid family and medical leave program in Connecticut. Senate Bill 0001, “An Act Concerning Paid Family and Medical Leave,” creates a Family and Medical Leave Insurance (FMLI) program to provide wage replacement benefits to certain employees taking leave for reasons allowed under Connecticut’s Family and Medical Leave Act (CFMLA). Continue Reading Connecticut House Passes Extensive Paid Family Medical Leave Bill

State senators voted early this morning to raise Connecticut’s hourly minimum wage to $15.00 by June 1, 2023 in a plan that involves five annual increases. House Bill 5004, “An Act Increasing the Minimum Fair Wage,” was proposed to provide more economic security to Connecticut families by increasing the minimum fair wage.  Continue Reading Connecticut Senate Passes Bill to Raise Minimum Wage to $15

In a case of first impression, the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court has found that, under Massachusetts law, retail and inside sales employees, paid entirely on a commission or draw basis, are entitled to separate and additional pay for overtime hours worked and premium pay for work on Sundays. See Sullivan v. Sleepy’s LLC, No. SJC-12542 (Mass. May 8, 2019). Continue Reading Massachusetts Supreme Court Rules Commission-Only Retail and Inside Salespeople are Entitled to Separate Overtime and Sunday Premium Pay

Effective May 10, 2020, New York City’s Human Rights Law will prohibit employers from requiring job applicants to submit to a marijuana or THC drug test as a condition of employment, with some limited exceptions. The NYC law is the first to ban pre-employment testing, but likely not the last in light of increasing momentum to legalize the recreational use of marijuana.  Continue Reading New York City Bans Pre-Employment Testing for Marijuana Use

I’ve said before and I’ll say it again.  Zero-tolerance policies are a bad idea when addressing sexual harassment complaints.  In fact, they shouldn’t even apply to complaints about discrimination or workplace infractions.  Although zero-tolerance policies convey the impression that an employer is taking a hard line stand against conduct it wants to discourage or eliminate, the reality is a little more complicated, just like the workplace. Continue Reading Zero-Tolerance Policies Hurt Harassment Reporting and #MeToo

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) recently released data detailing breakdowns for the charges of workplace discrimination it received in 2018. Sexual harassment charges increased 13.6% from 2017 – making sexual harassment the second most frequent charge filed with the EEOC.  Overall, the agency received 7,609 sexual harassment charges and obtained $56.6 million in monetary benefits for victims of sexual harassment. Continue Reading #MeToo Continues National and Local Impact: EEOC Identifies Increase in Sexual Harassment Charges, CGA Considers Change to Sexual Harassment Law

As we previously reported here, the “Stop Sexual Harassment in NYC Act” expanded the reach of the New York City Human Rights Law in the area of gender-based discrimination, including harassment.  Among other things, as of April 1, 2019, the law mandates employers with 15 or more employees (which includes independent contractors) in the previous calendar year to conduct annual anti-sexual harassment training to all employees, including managers and supervisors.  The law requires employers to train new employees who work more than 80 hours in a calendar year within 90 days of initial hire. Continue Reading New York City Commission on Human Rights Releases Online Gender Harassment Training

At long last, the federal Department of Labor has issued its widely anticipated second proposal to raise the minimum salary threshold for employees to qualify for various white collar exemptions under the Fair Labor Standards Act.  Following a failed attempt by the Obama-era DOL to set a salary threshold of $47,476, the DOL is setting its sights lower this time around with a proposed $35,308 salary threshold. Continue Reading Let’s Try That Again: DOL Proposes $35k Salary Threshold for Overtime Exemption