On October 28, 2021, New York Governor, Kathy Hochul, signed legislation protecting employees who report illegal or dangerous business activities from retaliation by their employers. Continue Reading New York Significantly Expands Protections For Employees Under Whistleblower Laws

On November 4, 2021, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration of the U.S. Department of Labor (“OSHA”), issued its long-awaited Emergency Temporary Standard (“ETS”), applicable to employers with at least 100 employees.  The ETS was issued by OSHA pursuant to President Biden’s COVID-19 Action Plan, announced last month, and provides minimum requirements in the implementation of mandatory vaccination policies.  The 490 page ETS is effective immediately, and preempts or supersedes any state or municipal law that conflicts with its requirements. Continue Reading OSHA Issues Long-Awaited Emergency Temporary Standard for Employers

Some people continue experiencing COVID-19 symptoms for weeks or months after first developing COVID-19. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have defined “long COVID” as “new or ongoing symptoms that can last weeks or months after first being infected with the virus that causes COVID-19.”  With the rise of long COVID, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) provided guidance on Long COVID and how it qualifies as a disability under the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”). Continue Reading In It For The Long Haul: Employer Obligations To Employees With Long COVID Symptoms

In response to COVID-19 vaccination mandates and employer-mandated vaccination policies, federal agencies continue to issue guidance.  The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and the U.S. Health and Human Services’ Office for Civil Rights (OCR) have released additional guidance addressing common employer concerns regarding vaccination status, discrimination, and reasonable accommodations. Continue Reading Handling COVID-19 Vaccination Mandates: Federal Agencies Continue to Issue Guidance

On Tuesday October 12, 2021, two New York federal judges issued rulings related to the enforcement of vaccine mandates in New York. Continue Reading New York Federal Courts Rule on Applicability of Religious Exemption to Two Separate Vaccine Mandates on Same Day

Two major legislative amendments to Connecticut’s employment statutes go into effect on October 1, 2021, both of which involve employers’ hiring practices. Continue Reading Amendments Impacting Connecticut Hiring Practices Take Effect October 1

On Thursday, September 9, 2021, President Joe Biden announced new COVID-19 vaccine mandates requiring all employers with 100+ employees to ensure their workers are vaccinated or tested weekly. Continue Reading President Mandates COVID-19 Vaccination For Millions Of Employees

As we first blogged on May 17, 2019, the Connecticut state hourly minimum wage will increase on August 1, 2021 from $12.00 to $13.00.  The change, made pursuant to Public Act 19-4, “An Act Increasing the Minimum Fair Wage,” will be the third of five scheduled annual increases to Connecticut’s hourly minimum wage since 2019.  A breakdown of the remaining increases under the Act is as follows: Continue Reading Connecticut Minimum Wage to Increase to $13/hour on August 1, 2021

On January 21, 2021, President Biden issued an Executive Order on Protecting Worker Health and Safety. The order directed the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to take action to reduce the risk that workers may contract COVID-19 in the workplace. On June 10, 2021, OSHA announced a highly-anticipated Emergency Temporary Standard (ETS) setting forth steps that employers in the healthcare industry must take to protect workers from COVID-19 risks while the pandemic is ongoing. The ETS will become effective 14 days after it is formally published in the Federal Register. Continue Reading OSHA Announces COVID-19 Emergency Temporary Standard for Healthcare Industry

On May 14, 2021, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act (“PWFA”) in a 315-101 vote, moving the bill to the Senate for consideration.  If passed, private sector employers with 15 or more employees and public sector employers will be required to make reasonable accommodations for pregnant workers (i.e., employees and job applicants with known limitations related to pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions).  However, employers are not required to make an accommodation if it imposes an undue hardship on the employer’s business. Continue Reading Federal Pregnant Workers Fairness Act Gains Steam, Passing House of Representatives – What Do CT, MA and NY Employers Need to Know?