Last summer, Governor Baker signed “An Act Relative to Minimum Wage, Paid Family Medical Leave, and the Sales Tax Holiday” (H.4640), which in part created a new Paid Family and Medical Leave program in the Commonwealth.  We provided further program details here.

The program was slated to be funded by a payroll tax on employers starting July 1, 2019.  Under the Act, the Department of Family and Medical Leave would collect a 0.63% payroll tax on employers to fund the estimated $800 million Paid Family and Medical Leave program.

However, on June 11, 2019, the Governor and state legislators announced agreement on a three-month delay in the implementation of the program. The extension would delay employer contributions until October 1, 2019 and gives employers more time to understand the rules and inform its employees.

The legislature must still pass a bill to implement the delay, so employers should still work towards implementing compliance with the Act. Assuming such a bill is implemented, however, employers will obtain some welcome summertime relief to plan and prepare for implementation of the Act.

We will continue to monitor developments concerning the Paid Family and Medical Leave program and will provide further updates as more information becomes available.  As always, Murtha lawyers are available to help Massachusetts businesses regarding their obligations under the program and other relevant employment laws.

Print:
EmailTweetLikeLinkedIn
Photo of Chelsea K. Choi Chelsea K. Choi

Chelsea K. Choi is a member of the Firm’s Labor and Employment  Practice Group. She represents employers on a variety of matters including hiring, evaluation, discipline, layoff, and termination of employees.

Prior to joining Murtha Cullina, Chelsea was an associate and law clerk

Chelsea K. Choi is a member of the Firm’s Labor and Employment  Practice Group. She represents employers on a variety of matters including hiring, evaluation, discipline, layoff, and termination of employees.

Prior to joining Murtha Cullina, Chelsea was an associate and law clerk at prominent law firms in Hartford, CT and Springfield, MA. While in law school, she served as a Note Editor of The Western New England Law Review at Western New England School of Law. Chelsea received her B.A., cum laude, from Syracuse University, where she was a team member and co-captain of the Syracuse University Cheerleading Program.

Photo of Matthew K. Curtin Matthew K. Curtin

Matthew Curtin is a Partner in the Litigation Department, the Chair of the Privacy and Cybersecurity Practice Group and a member of the Labor and Employment Practice Group.

In Matthew’s cybersecurity practice, he advises clients on compliance with state, federal and international privacy…

Matthew Curtin is a Partner in the Litigation Department, the Chair of the Privacy and Cybersecurity Practice Group and a member of the Labor and Employment Practice Group.

In Matthew’s cybersecurity practice, he advises clients on compliance with state, federal and international privacy laws including the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). Matthew is particularly interested in advising his clients concerning employment privacy matters. Matthew is a member of the International Association of Privacy Professionals.

In Matthew’s labor and employment practice, he has successfully represented employers of all sizes concerning a wide variety of claims before state and federal courts, the National Labor Relations Board, the Connecticut State Board of Mediation and Arbitration, the Connecticut State Board of Labor Relations, the Connecticut Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities, and other various administrative agencies.

Matthew has substantial experience with collective bargaining negotiations, labor arbitrations, and labor relations. He regularly counsels senior management and human resources professionals concerning employment contracts, employment policies, hiring and termination procedures, workplace investigations, and harassment and discrimination avoidance.

Matthew has significant experience representing businesses in litigation concerning trade secret theft, unfair competition, and breach of non-competition and non-solicitation agreements.