Photo of Alyssa R. Ferreone

Alyssa Ferreone is an Associate in the Murtha Cullina Litigation Department.

Prior to joining Murtha Cullina, Alyssa was a Judicial Law Clerk for the Honorable Robert J. Devlin, Jr. and the Honorable Melanie L. Cradle at the Connecticut Appellate Court.

Alyssa earned her J.D. from Quinnipiac University School of Law, magna cum laude.  While in law school, Alyssa was a judicial intern for the Honorable Vanessa L. Bryant of the United States District Court for the District of Connecticut.  She served as the Supervising Note Editor on the Quinnipiac Health Law Journal and the Vice Magister of the Burns Inn Chapter of the Phi Delta Phi legal honor society. Alyssa was selected by the law school faculty to receive the Academic Excellence Award at commencement.

Alyssa earned her B.S. from Southeastern University where she named “Most Outstanding Graduate in the Legal Studies Major” at commencement.

On June 20, the New York State Assembly passed Bill A1278B which, together with New York State Senate’s passage of identical legislation, Bill 3100A[2] earlier this month, would render all non-compete agreements signed or modified after the effective date unlawful. All that stands in the way of these bills becoming law is Governor Kathy Hochul’s signature.
Continue Reading New York Set to Ban Non-Compete Clauses in Employment

On April 6, 2023, the New York City Department of Consumer and Worker Protection (“DCWP”) issued a Final Rule to provide guidance regarding the City’s Automated Employment Decision Tool (“AEDT”) Law, which we covered in more detail here. The Final Rule generally clarifies employer obligations under the AEDT Law, which will be enforced beginning July 5, 2023. Here are the most notable provisions of the Final Rule:Continue Reading NYC Department of Consumer and Worker Protection Issues Guidance on Automated Employment Decision Tool Law

On January 1, 2023, Connecticut Public Act No. 21-32[1] the “Clean Slate” law expanded protections for applicants and employees with criminal records. Employers are prohibited from requesting information about, making hiring decisions based on, or discriminating or discharging employees based on criminal records that have been erased.

The new law allows for erasure of

On December 9, 2022, Governor Hochul signed legislation expanding New York’s required accommodations for breastfeeding in the workplace. The new law takes effect 180 days after signing, on June 7, 2023.

New York employers were already required to provide employees with reasonable break times and to make reasonable efforts to provide a space for

Are you confused about the lawsuit filed on November 3, 2022 against Twitter claiming that its recent and impending layoffs violate the federal Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act (the “WARN Act”) and state laws? Here’s what you need to know about the WARN Act and the Twitter lawsuit.

The WARN Act requires employers to

The New York City Council recently enacted an ordinance banning artificial intelligence (“AI”) in employment decisions unless the technology has been subject to an independent bias audit within a year of use.

Many employers have been using AI in employment decisions for years without regulation. This technology can range from algorithms finding ideal candidates to software used to asses a candidate’s performance during screening interviews. While AI tools promote efficiency, reduce costs, and can help employers make informed decisions, technology can run afoul of discrimination laws by reinforcing bias or screening out candidates of protected classes.
Continue Reading New York City Council Passes Law Regulating Use of Artificial Intelligence in Employment Decisions

On January 15, 2022, New York City Council adopted a local law requiring covered employers with four or more employees to include salary ranges for open job positions beginning on May 15, 2022. For more information on the Local Law, see our original blog post here. On April 28, 2022, the City Council adopted an amendment to the Local Law, moving the effective date to November 1, 2022.
Continue Reading New York City Council Amends Wage Transparency Law

On March 22, 2022, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) partially reopened the comment period to allow for additional public comment on specific topics covered by its proposed final standard to protect healthcare workers from workplace exposure to COVID-19.
Continue Reading OSHA Seeks Comments on Proposed Final Rule Protecting Healthcare Works from Occupational Exposure to COVID-19

On March 3, 2022, President Biden signed into law the “Ending Forced Arbitration of Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment Act of 2021” (the “Act”).  The Act, which takes effect immediately, amends the Federal Arbitration Act (the “FAA”) by narrowing both its scope and applicability. Specifically, the Act prohibits employers from forcing employees to settle sexual misconduct claims in closed-door arbitration venues.
Continue Reading The End of Forced Arbitration in Sexual Misconduct Cases