Photo of Alyssa R. Ferreone

Alyssa Ferreone is an Associate in the Murtha Cullina Litigation Department.

Prior to joining Murtha Cullina, Alyssa was a Judicial Law Clerk for the Honorable Robert J. Devlin, Jr. and the Honorable Melanie L. Cradle at the Connecticut Appellate Court.

Alyssa earned her J.D. from Quinnipiac University School of Law, magna cum laude.  While in law school, Alyssa was a judicial intern for the Honorable Vanessa L. Bryant of the United States District Court for the District of Connecticut.  She served as the Supervising Note Editor on the Quinnipiac Health Law Journal and the Vice Magister of the Burns Inn Chapter of the Phi Delta Phi legal honor society. Alyssa was selected by the law school faculty to receive the Academic Excellence Award at commencement.

Alyssa earned her B.S. from Southeastern University where she named “Most Outstanding Graduate in the Legal Studies Major” at commencement.

The New York City Council recently enacted an ordinance banning artificial intelligence (“AI”) in employment decisions unless the technology has been subject to an independent bias audit within a year of use.

Many employers have been using AI in employment decisions for years without regulation. This technology can range from algorithms finding ideal candidates to software used to asses a candidate’s performance during screening interviews. While AI tools promote efficiency, reduce costs, and can help employers make informed decisions, technology can run afoul of discrimination laws by reinforcing bias or screening out candidates of protected classes.
Continue Reading New York City Council Passes Law Regulating Use of Artificial Intelligence in Employment Decisions

On January 15, 2022, New York City Council adopted a local law requiring covered employers with four or more employees to include salary ranges for open job positions beginning on May 15, 2022. For more information on the Local Law, see our original blog post here. On April 28, 2022, the City Council adopted an amendment to the Local Law, moving the effective date to November 1, 2022.

Continue Reading New York City Council Amends Wage Transparency Law

On March 22, 2022, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) partially reopened the comment period to allow for additional public comment on specific topics covered by its proposed final standard to protect healthcare workers from workplace exposure to COVID-19.
Continue Reading OSHA Seeks Comments on Proposed Final Rule Protecting Healthcare Works from Occupational Exposure to COVID-19

On March 3, 2022, President Biden signed into law the “Ending Forced Arbitration of Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment Act of 2021” (the “Act”).  The Act, which takes effect immediately, amends the Federal Arbitration Act (the “FAA”) by narrowing both its scope and applicability. Specifically, the Act prohibits employers from forcing employees to settle sexual misconduct claims in closed-door arbitration venues.
Continue Reading The End of Forced Arbitration in Sexual Misconduct Cases

On January 15, 2022, the New York City Council adopted an amendment to the New York City Human Rights Law (NYCHRL), requiring covered employers to include salary ranges for positions open to prospective or current employees.  Employers with four or more employees (including independent contractors) are covered by the law.  The new Local Law, which takes effect on May 15, 2022, expands upon a 2017 amendment that barred employers from inquiring about a prospective employee’s “salary history.”
Continue Reading New York City Enacts Law Requiring Employers to Provide Salary Ranges in Job Advertisements

Several updates related to COVID-19 vaccination mandates occurred this week at the federal and local levels.  On December 17, the Sixth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals lifted the stay on the federal government’s mandate that employees of covered employers receive a COVID-19 vaccination or undergo weekly testing.  The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (“OSHA”) will begin enforcing the previously stayed Emergency Temporary Standard (“ETS”) on January 10, 2022.
Continue Reading Hello Again: OSHA’s COVID 19 Vaccination Mandate for Private Employers is Back, and NYC has Its Own

Some people continue experiencing COVID-19 symptoms for weeks or months after first developing COVID-19. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have defined “long COVID” as “new or ongoing symptoms that can last weeks or months after first being infected with the virus that causes COVID-19.”  With the rise of long COVID, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) provided guidance on Long COVID and how it qualifies as a disability under the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”).
Continue Reading In It For The Long Haul: Employer Obligations To Employees With Long COVID Symptoms

In response to COVID-19 vaccination mandates and employer-mandated vaccination policies, federal agencies continue to issue guidance.  The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and the U.S. Health and Human Services’ Office for Civil Rights (OCR) have released additional guidance addressing common employer concerns regarding vaccination status, discrimination, and reasonable accommodations.
Continue Reading Handling COVID-19 Vaccination Mandates: Federal Agencies Continue to Issue Guidance