Photo of Emily McDonough Souza

Emily McDonough Souza is counsel in the Labor & Employment and Litigation practices at Murtha Cullina.  Her experience includes representing clients in a broad range of disputes involving insurance coverage, business torts, and contractual rights, as well as representing employers in claims involving discrimination and retaliation, breach of non-compete and restrictive covenants, and wage and hour violations.  Emily has regularly appeared on behalf of clients in both state and federal court matters, including oral arguments, mediations, depositions, and pretrial conferences.

Prior to joining Murtha Cullina, Emily clerked for the Honorable Eliot D. Prescott of the Connecticut Appellate Court.  She received her J.D. magna cum laude from Quinnipiac University School of Law, where she served as the Executive Managing Editor of the Quinnipiac Law Review. Emily earned her B.S. magna cum laude from the University of Connecticut, where she was a member of the Honors Program.

On April 23, 2024, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) issued a final rule substantially raising the salary thresholds for certain employees to qualify for overtime exemptions under the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).

The FLSA generally requires covered employers to pay employees a minimum wage and, for employees who work more than 40

On April 15, 2024, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) issued its final rule and interpretive guidance implementing the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act (PWFA). The federal law, which went into effect June 27, 2023, and applies to employers with 15 or more employees, expands protections for qualified employees and applicants with regard to reasonable

On April 17, 2024, the U.S. Supreme Court resolved a circuit split by holding that while an employee challenging an allegedly discriminatory job transfer under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 must show that the transfer caused some identifiable disadvantage, the disadvantage need not be significant.

The allegations underlying the Muldrow v.

On August 2, 2023, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) adopted a new standard for assessing whether workplace rules, including policies found in handbooks, infringe upon employees’ rights under Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA), in violation of Section 8(a)(1) of the NLRA.
Continue Reading NLRB Issues New Standard for Scrutinizing Employers’ Workplace Rules

On May 18, 2023, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) issued a non-binding “technical assistance” document that offers employers guidance on the applicability of Title VII to the use of artificial intelligence (“AI”) in employment selection procedures such as hiring, promoting and firing. The guidance comes as the EEOC continues to prioritize its consideration of potential discriminatory policies and practices that incorporate AI
Continue Reading EEOC Issues New Guidance on Use of Artificial Intelligence in Employment Selection Procedures

The National Labor Relations Board’s General Counsel Jennifer Abruzzo issued Memorandum GC 23-05 which provides additional guidance on the recent NLRB decision in McLaren Macomb regarding confidentiality and nondisparagement clauses
Continue Reading NLRB General Counsel Issues Guidance on Recent Decision Regarding Confidentiality and Non-Disparagement Clauses

On February 21, 2023, the National Labor Relations Board (the “Board”) issued a decision that returns to previous precedent, holding that employers may not offer employees severance agreements that require employees to broadly waive their rights under the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”).

Under the Board’s new rule issued in McLaren Macomb, 372 NLRB

On May 17, 2022, Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont signed into law the so-called “captive audience” bill (Senate Bill 163), which prohibits employers from requiring their employees to (a) attend employer-sponsored meetings that have a primary purpose of communicating the employer’s opinion concerning religious or political matters, or (b) listen to speech or view communications that have a primary purpose of communicating the employer’s opinion regarding religious or political matters.  The law goes into effect on July 1, 2022.
Continue Reading Connecticut Governor Signs Law Prohibiting Employer-Employee “Captive Audience” Communications

On January 13, 2022, the United States Supreme Court issued its highly anticipated decision blocking the Biden administration from enforcing an Occupational Safety and Health Administration (“OSHA”) rule mandating vaccine-or-testing for large businesses.
Continue Reading Supreme Court Blocks Enforcement of OSHA Vaccine-or-Testing Mandate