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Salvatore G. Gangemi is a Partner in the Litigation Department of Murtha Cullina and a member of the Labor and Employment Practice Group. He advises clients with respect to state, federal and local employment laws. In addition, he litigates matters involving misappropriation of trade secrets, restrictive covenants, breach of employment contract, fiduciary duty, and other work-related common law claims. Sal also counsels clients on day-to-day issues involving workplace management and administration, including requests for reasonable accommodation for disabilities, for family and medical leave, and wage and hour issues.  He conducts employment law training on a variety of topics, including sexual harassment prevention and wage/ hour compliance.  He also drafts employment policies and agreements, and assists clients in auditing worker classification practices and policies both in the context of the Fair Labor Standards Act and state laws governing independent contractor determinations.

New York has amended its sick leave law (Labor Law § 196-b) to provide paid prenatal personal leave to all employees. Effective January 1, 2025, all employers shall be required to provide their employees with 20 hours of paid prenatal personal leave per 52-week period. Prenatal personal leave is leave taken by an employee “during

Two days ago, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) issued its “Final Rule” banning non-compete clauses in employment. Until now, the FTC never officially declared that such clauses constituted an “unfair method of competition.” The Final Rule seeks to upend centuries of state law governing the use of non-compete clauses in employment, including state laws that

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) has issued a Final Rule on the standards for determining independent contractor status for purposes of minimum wage and overtime pay issues under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). Although the Final Rule is considered “new,” it is based on the standard that was applied prior to the 2021

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) have agreed to team up to investigate and enforce protections for workers who raise safety concerns and suffer retaliation as a result.
Continue Reading NLRB and OSHA Enter Into Collaboration Agreement To Pursue Violations Implicating Both NLRA and OSH Act

Today, the U.S. Department of Labor announced a proposal to increase the Fair Labor Standards Act’s (FLSA) salary-level threshold from $35,568 to $55,068, which would result in many more employees being entitled to overtime pay for hours worked in excess of 40 in a workweek.
Continue Reading Major Proposed Hike in Salary-Level Threshold Affecting Overtime Exemptions: What Employers Need to Know

On August 2, 2023, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) adopted a new standard for assessing whether workplace rules, including policies found in handbooks, infringe upon employees’ rights under Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA), in violation of Section 8(a)(1) of the NLRA.
Continue Reading NLRB Issues New Standard for Scrutinizing Employers’ Workplace Rules

On June 20, the New York State Assembly passed Bill A1278B which, together with New York State Senate’s passage of identical legislation, Bill 3100A[2] earlier this month, would render all non-compete agreements signed or modified after the effective date unlawful. All that stands in the way of these bills becoming law is Governor Kathy Hochul’s signature.
Continue Reading New York Set to Ban Non-Compete Clauses in Employment

Connecticut’s legislature has amended the state’s physician noncompete law to provide for additional restrictions on physician noncompete agreements. (Public Act No. 23-97). In addition, Connecticut has extended noncompete restrictions to advanced practice registered nurses (nurse practitioners) and physician assistants. Governor Lamont is expected to sign the amendment, but has not yet done so.

On May 18, 2023, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) issued a non-binding “technical assistance” document that offers employers guidance on the applicability of Title VII to the use of artificial intelligence (“AI”) in employment selection procedures such as hiring, promoting and firing. The guidance comes as the EEOC continues to prioritize its consideration of potential discriminatory policies and practices that incorporate AI
Continue Reading EEOC Issues New Guidance on Use of Artificial Intelligence in Employment Selection Procedures