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Salvatore G. Gangemi is a Partner in the Litigation Department of Murtha Cullina and a member of the Labor and Employment Practice Group. He advises clients with respect to state, federal and local employment laws. In addition, he litigates matters involving misappropriation of trade secrets, restrictive covenants, breach of employment contract, fiduciary duty, and other work-related common law claims. Sal also counsels clients on day-to-day issues involving workplace management and administration, including requests for reasonable accommodation for disabilities, for family and medical leave, and wage and hour issues.  He conducts employment law training on a variety of topics, including sexual harassment prevention and wage/ hour compliance.  He also drafts employment policies and agreements, and assists clients in auditing worker classification practices and policies both in the context of the Fair Labor Standards Act and state laws governing independent contractor determinations.

The U.S. Department of Labor has announced that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has initiated a National Emphasis Program (NEP) to prevent falls in the workplace, which OSHA states is the leading cause of workplace injuries and fatalities, ahead of violations of OSHA’s respiratory protection standard. Although most of the citations involving fall

On April 6, 2023, the New York City Department of Consumer and Worker Protection (“DCWP”) issued a Final Rule to provide guidance regarding the City’s Automated Employment Decision Tool (“AEDT”) Law, which we covered in more detail here. The Final Rule generally clarifies employer obligations under the AEDT Law, which will be enforced beginning July 5, 2023. Here are the most notable provisions of the Final Rule:Continue Reading NYC Department of Consumer and Worker Protection Issues Guidance on Automated Employment Decision Tool Law

The National Labor Relations Board’s General Counsel Jennifer Abruzzo issued Memorandum GC 23-05 which provides additional guidance on the recent NLRB decision in McLaren Macomb regarding confidentiality and nondisparagement clauses
Continue Reading NLRB General Counsel Issues Guidance on Recent Decision Regarding Confidentiality and Non-Disparagement Clauses

On February 21, 2023, the National Labor Relations Board (the “Board”) issued a decision that returns to previous precedent, holding that employers may not offer employees severance agreements that require employees to broadly waive their rights under the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”).

Under the Board’s new rule issued in McLaren Macomb, 372 NLRB

Last month, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) released its Draft Strategic Enforcement Plan for 2023- 2027 (SEP), and invited the public to submit comments by February 9, 2023.

The EEOC continues to emphasize the elimination of barriers in recruitment and hiring, and seeks to prioritize its consideration of policies and practices that incorporate artificial

On January 1, 2023, Connecticut Public Act No. 21-32[1] the “Clean Slate” law expanded protections for applicants and employees with criminal records. Employers are prohibited from requesting information about, making hiring decisions based on, or discriminating or discharging employees based on criminal records that have been erased.

The new law allows for erasure of

On December 9, 2022, Governor Hochul signed legislation expanding New York’s required accommodations for breastfeeding in the workplace. The new law takes effect 180 days after signing, on June 7, 2023.

New York employers were already required to provide employees with reasonable break times and to make reasonable efforts to provide a space for

Are you confused about the lawsuit filed on November 3, 2022 against Twitter claiming that its recent and impending layoffs violate the federal Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act (the “WARN Act”) and state laws? Here’s what you need to know about the WARN Act and the Twitter lawsuit.

The WARN Act requires employers to

NYC Pay Transparency Law became effective on November 1, 2022.

What does this mean for employers?

If you have four or more employees (including independent contractors) you are required to post minimum and maximum salary ranges for available positions for the benefit of current and prospective employees.

Failure to comply can result in significant civil