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As a member of the Firm’s Litigation Department, Ms. Gruber represents clients in a variety of commercial and business law disputes, including in the areas of complex commercial litigation, bankruptcy and creditors’ rights, municipal law, appellate litigation, and labor and employment.

Ms. Gruber brings to the firm her experiences in two judicial clerkships. She clerked for the Honorable Dennis G. Eveleigh, Associate Justice of the Connecticut Supreme Court. She then clerked for the Honorable Jeffrey Alker Meyer, United States District Judge for the District of Connecticut.

Prior to joining Murtha Cullina, Ms. Gruber received her B.A., with general honors, from Johns Hopkins University, where she spent a semester studying in Madrid, Spain. She earned her Juris Doctor from Quinnipiac University School of Law, summa cum laude.

While in law school, Ms. Gruber was a judicial intern for the Honorable Janet Bond Arterton of the United States District Court for the District of Connecticut, as well as Editor-in-Chief of the Quinnipiac Law Review. She also volunteered for and became the program coordinator of the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Program, administered by the Internal Revenue Service.

A new Massachusetts law significantly enhances existing anti-discrimination protections for pregnant employees. The “Massachusetts Pregnant Workers Fairness Act,” effective April 1, 2018, prevents discrimination against, and expressly protects, employees who are pregnant or are experiencing pre- and post-birth pregnancy-related medical needs, including, but not limited to, lactation, expressing breast milk, and recovering from childbirth. Continue Reading Take Note: the Massachusetts Pregnant Workers Fairness Act Is Now In Effect!

Last week, the National Association of Attorneys General (NAAG) sent a letter to leaders in Congress, urging the passage of legislation that would prohibit mandatory arbitration of workplace sexual harassment claims. In the letter, 56 attorneys general of the United States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, American Samoa, Guam, and the Virgin Islands called on Congress to allow victims of workplace sexual harassment claims to have their days in court and be afforded the “procedural and substantive due process” that comes with proceeding with a lawsuit.   Continue Reading Attorneys General Support Ending Arbitration of Workplace Sexual Harassment Claims

On August 22, 2017, a federal trial judge injected uncertainty into the ability of in-house counsel to communicate with company employees during an Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) investigation. In EEOC v. Day & Zimmerman NPS, Inc. (D. Conn. Aug. 22, 2017), Judge Victor A. Bolden concluded that an employer could be liable for ADA retaliation by sending a letter to its employees informing them of the existence of an ADA claim by an employee and advising them about potential interviews by the EEOC.

By way of background, the employee involved had filed a charge with the EEOC, alleging that a company had violated the ADA by firing him from working at the Millstone nuclear power station after he provided a doctor’s note indicating that he could not work around radiation. The EEOC soon commenced an investigation into the charge, requesting a list of roughly 150 employees who worked at Millstone during the time period at issue, including those individuals’ names, job titles, dates of employment, home addresses, and telephone numbers. Continue Reading Company May Violate ADA by Informing Employees about Details of EEOC Investigation