Governor Cuomo’s most recent executive order requires employees “present in the workplace” to wear “face coverings” when in “direct contact with customers or members of the public.”  The order further requires that employers pay for and provide such face coverings.  The order is effective Wednesday night, April 15, 2020 at 8:00pm.

Continue Reading Cuomo Orders Employers to Provide “Face Coverings” for External-facing Employees

On Tuesday, April 7, 2020, Governor Lamont issued Executive Order 7V, ordering Connecticut employers to take “additional protective measures to reduce the risk” of COVID-19 transmission. The Department of Economic and Community Development supplemented the Executive Order with its “Safe Workplace Rules for Essential Employers,” i.e., specific, “legally binding statewide rules prescribing such additional protective measures.”
Continue Reading Connecticut Issues Binding Safe Workplace Rules for Essential Employers

The Families First Coronavirus Relief Act’s (“FFCRA”) swift enactment left employers scrambling to interpret its provisions.  Fortunately, the Department of Labor has issued temporary regulations that resolve many common questions and scenarios.  Final regulations are expected on April 6th.

The FFCRA provides two types of paid leave: the Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act (“EPSLA”) and Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion Act (“EFMLEA”).  You can read about the basic provisions of FFCRA here.  This post summarizes some critical issues concerning FFCRA implementation.


Continue Reading DOL Issues Temporary Regulations Detailing FFCRA Paid Leave Rules

The federal Department of Labor (DOL) continues to update its Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) FAQ leading up to the April 1, 2020 implementation. Over the past week, the DOL has supplemented the FFCRA FAQ several times to provide guidance and clarifications concerning lingering questions. Some of the recent clarifications we find helpful are below.

Continue Reading Department of Labor Continues to Update FAQ Concerning Families First Coronavirus Response Act

On Wednesday night, the Senate passed unanimously (96-0) a $2 trillion emergency relief bill. The measure would constitute the largest economic stimulus package in U.S. history. Key provisions include:

Continue Reading Senate Passes Massive Coronavirus Aid Package; Would Provide Financial Relief for Employers and Employees

Updating our prior Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) guidance, today the Department of Labor issued a model poster concerning FFCRA rights and responsibilities. The poster is accessible at: https://www.dol.gov/sites/dolgov/files/WHD/posters/FFCRA_Poster_WH1422_Non-Federal.pdf

The FFCRA requires covered employers post in a conspicuous place on its premises a notice of FFCRA requirements. For covered employers with remote work forces,

Yesterday, the Department of Labor issued preliminary guidance concerning the implementation of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (the “FFCRA”), which was passed just six days ago.  The guidance provides some clarity on a few key issues:

Continue Reading Department of Labor Releases Preliminary Guidance Concerning the Families First Coronavirus Response Act

Last week, President Trump signed into law the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“FFCRA”), which requires employers with fewer than 500 employees to provide employees expanded family and medical leave and paid sick leave benefits for Coronavirus-related reasons.  The FFCRA creates for certain private employers a refundable paid sick leave credit and paid child care leave credit that are intended to immediately and fully reimburse these employers, dollar-for-dollar, for the cost of providing Coronavirus-related leave to their employees.

Continue Reading IRS and DOL Preview How Employers Can Recoup Costs of Providing Paid Leave to Employees for Coronavirus-Related Absences

Effective at noon on March 24, 2020, Massachusetts will become the latest state to close non-essential businesses in the effort to slow the spread of COVID-19.  As covered here previously, Connecticut and New York issued substantially similar executive orders in days immediately prior.  The Massachusetts order identifies “essential” businesses, orders the closing of non-essential businesses