The New York City Council recently enacted an ordinance banning artificial intelligence (“AI”) in employment decisions unless the technology has been subject to an independent bias audit within a year of use.

Many employers have been using AI in employment decisions for years without regulation. This technology can range from algorithms finding ideal candidates to

In March 2022, Governor Kathy Hochul signed legislation amending the New York State Human Rights Law to establish a sexual harassment hotline directly to the New York State Division of Human Rights (NYSDHR). The hotline (800-HARASS-3), which is now active, is intended to be staffed by pro bono lawyers experienced in counseling individuals on sexual harassment. Contact with the hotline does not constitute the filing of a harassment complaint, and individuals intending to file a complaint with the NYSDHR would still be required to follow existing procedures for doing so.
Continue Reading New York Workplace Sexual Harassment Hotline Now Operational

On January 15, 2022, New York City Council adopted a local law requiring covered employers with four or more employees to include salary ranges for open job positions beginning on May 15, 2022. For more information on the Local Law, see our original blog post here. On April 28, 2022, the City Council adopted an amendment to the Local Law, moving the effective date to November 1, 2022.

Continue Reading New York City Council Amends Wage Transparency Law

Effective October 1, 2019, Connecticut increased the minimum wage and implemented extensive revisions to existing sexual harassment laws. Below is a brief summary of the changes. As always, Murtha employment lawyers are available to discuss these new laws and how they may affect your organization.

Changes to Connecticut Sexual Harassment Laws

Continue Reading Revised Sexual Harassment Law and Minimum Wage Increase Take Effect October 1, 2019

On October 17, 2018, the New York City Council passed several bills, referred to as a parental empowerment package, which will likely be signed by the mayor. These bills require employers with 15 or more employees to provide a “lactation space” and “lactation accommodation” for employees who need to express and store breast milk.  Specifically, employers will be required to designate a private sanitary place that is not a restroom for purposes of expressing milk. Although since 2008 New York State law has required employers to allow nursing mothers with breaks to express milk, New York City will require a dedicated room for this purpose. In addition to providing a lactation space, which must be in reasonable proximity to the employee’s work area, the law will also require that employers provide a refrigerator that is suitable for breast milk storage.
Continue Reading NYC Council Votes to Require Lactation Room and Accommodation Policy

Just as the 2018 legislative session came to a close on the night of July 31, 2018, the Legislature passed a bill reforming the law of noncompetition agreements (“noncompetes”) in Massachusetts.  The bill is being viewed as a compromise following years of unsuccessful efforts to pass noncompete reform.  The governor is expected to sign the bill into law in the coming days. 
Continue Reading After Years of Debate, Massachusetts Finally Passes Non-Compete Bill